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BulletinNovDec2017

Reflections (cont. from pg. 14) lights remain on, dimming occasionally. Trying to Sleep Finally, at about 10:30 PM, everyone retires. There is a bit of encouraging news while listening to digital TV and dozing off. Hurricane Irma has decreased from a Category 4 to a 2 or 1. Water surges are now anticipated to be less severe. Finally, off to sleep. A trace of light peeks through the window in the early morn-ing. You can’t believe that the electricity is still on. Your mind is blurred, hardly realizing what day it is. Peering out the window, a few tree limbs are down and the wind is blowing and it’s raining. A friend calls, one who stayed behind, and indicates that your house is intact with a few trees down. An overwhelming feeling of relief occurs. Restoration and Resolve Cars are retrieved from the Florida Hospital parking garage undamaged. You and your colleagues, who for an evening were “family,” two cats included, pick up belongings, pack cars, and say good-bye early Monday afternoon. A special bond is felt as we hug and head home. Millions in Florida and the Tampa Bay area are without elec-tricity, so too, your home. A natural gas generator, installed in 2004 after a similar experience, makes the home habitable. Wel-comed communications from family and friends are interspersed throughout the day, while you begin restoring it back to normal. The anticipation of a decent night’s rest keeps you motivated. A few staff show up Tuesday to put the clinic back in order, and phones are reconnected late afternoon. Not a normal day but, nevertheless, welcomed. At 2:00 AM, Wednesday, your son and family arrive from Atlanta, an 18-hour trip. Your wife flew back Tuesday afternoon. Calls are made to assure that friends and colleagues are okay, only one had major damage to her home. A feeling of exhaustion and some depression ensues especially because of having to can-cel a trip to Alaska to lecture and fish with your brother. This very day, he is on the Kenai River as you stare at the e-mailed pictures of rainbow trout and silver salmon. Back to Work, Family, Friends, and Colleagues A week later, full-time work is established and the stress from Irma begins to dissipate. The news is now about Hurricane Ma-ria, which tragically causes more damage to the Caribbean Is-lands and to Puerto Rico, the latter where you have been a visiting professor on many occasions. What enabled you and others to cope with the trials and tribu-lations of this catastrophic hurricane? First, the collegiality and cooperation of people coming together to face a potential crisis. Experiences and friendships were made which will never be for-gotten. Second, the phone calls, text messages, and e-mails from both within and outside of harm’s way. Hearing from so many before, during, and after the hurricane was essential to our well-being. One additional thought, Floridians love their state and life-style. However, you quickly learn that hurricanes are a part of life. As it returns to normal, the NHC is periodically accessed. Fortunately, hurricane season ended November 30th. Add A Little Fun to Your Life! ...Learn To It’s Easy. We’ll Show You How! SHORT & FUN BEGINNERS COURSE - $79 Call (813) 253-0644 GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE FL Reg. 007 Blanche & Emilio Librero School & Dance Club Since 1979 ...Your Place to Learn ...Your Place to Dance Davis Islands, Tampa  www.LibrerosDanceStudio.com 16 HCMA BULLETIN, Vol 63, No. 4 – November/December 2017


BulletinNovDec2017
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